Scientists discover “indication” that could be evidence of a previous life on Mars

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According to Dirk Schultz McCoch, astronomer at Washington State University, the presence of theophene molecules on the Red Planet has been discovered and is likely to have resulted from biological, not chemical, processes.

“We were able to identify several biological pathways to explain the presence of theophene,” McCutch said. “It appears that these pathways are not chemical, but we need proof.”

He added: “If you find thiophene on the ground, you will think that it is the result of biological processes, but on Mars the matter lies in the evidence,” according to the British “Sky News”.

Along with Jakob Heinz of the University of Technology Berlin, McCutch studied the effect of meteorites and that they may have caused the production of the compound given the high pressure levels involved in the process, as well as a certain type of chemical process that requires heating the compound at temperatures up to 120 degrees Celsius or more.

But scientists believe the biological scenario is the most likely, saying that bacteria may have existed when Mars was warmer and wetter more than 3 billion years ago, and thus produced a chemical compound.

McCutch and Heinz hope that the next probe to Mars will search for isotopes of carbon and sulfur, which would provide another great clue as to whether life is on the Red Planet.

Commenting on this point, McCuch said: “As (astronomer) Karl Sagan said … exceptional allegations require extraordinary evidence. I think the evidence will really require that we send people out there, that an astronaut look through a microscope and see a moving microbe.”

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According to Dirk Schultz McCoch, astronomer at Washington State University, the presence of theophene molecules on the Red Planet has been discovered and is likely to have resulted from biological, not chemical, processes.

“We were able to identify several biological pathways to explain the presence of theophene,” McCutch said. “It appears that these pathways are not chemical, but we need proof.”

He added: “If you find thiophene on the ground, you will think that it is the result of biological processes, but on Mars the matter lies in the evidence,” according to the British “Sky News”.

Along with Jakob Heinz of the University of Technology Berlin, McCutch studied the effect of meteorites and that they may have caused the production of the compound given the high pressure levels involved in the process, as well as a certain type of chemical process that requires heating the compound at temperatures up to 120 degrees Celsius or more.

But scientists believe the biological scenario is the most likely, saying that bacteria may have existed when Mars was warmer and wetter more than 3 billion years ago, and thus produced a chemical compound.

McCutch and Heinz hope that the next probe to Mars will search for isotopes of carbon and sulfur, which would provide another great clue as to whether life is on the Red Planet.

Commenting on this point, McCuch said: “As (astronomer) Karl Sagan said … exceptional allegations require extraordinary evidence. I think the evidence will really require that we send people out there, that an astronaut look through a microscope and see a moving microbe.”

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